Dating my marshall cabinet

25-Feb-2020 15:39 by 10 Comments

Dating my marshall cabinet - mary louise parker dating

But it also had the characteristic smoothness of the tube rectifier.For this reason, this amp is known today as the JTM-50.

In this article, I’ll try to cover the more “desirable” Marshall amps that were built since 1962 up to the JCM800 series, wich most consider to be the “last” great Marshalls produced (That until Marshall released the Vintage Modern series. I will also try to give examples of where they were used.. I hope you like it These are just a few of the thousands of codes that Marshall came up with for their amps. There were many cosmetic changes on the first years until it finally got the “Classic Marshall Look” by 1964.Because of rumors that Slash was going to steal the amp (and legend says he did it! Then, a misinformed roadie returned it a year later (and was probably fired afterwards). The first JMP marked amps came out around late 1967, although, as you saw, all of them already had JMP characteristics. An important note is that, by 1968, there were some changes on the circuits that made the amps more aggressive.), SIR studios switched amps, and Slash ended up “renting” #36 instead: a late 70’s JMP, also modified like #39 (He didn’t notice the difference? All the models mentioned above are still being produced here. Yes: On Van Halen’s debut album, a 100% stock 1968 Marshall Super Lead #1959 was used.I won’t write the rest because it may confuse you even more. It’s important to note that, for example, a 1959 amp has nothing to do with the The JTM-45 JTM-45 with “block” logo The first Marshall ever made. The front panel has “Presence”, “Bass”, “Middle” and “Treble” controls, as well as 2 volumes and 4 inputs.It was basically a copy of the 1959 Fender Bassman. In 1965, the plexiglass faceplates were introduced.Please note the “Black Flag” JTM marking that was used at that time.

The JTM-100, now with four EL-34s too, also gained a proper 100w transformer. It was called Marshall Super Lead 100w #1959 (Although they still didn’t have the “JMP” mark on the front, In my view, this amps are already into the JMP territory, because they have all of the JMP characteristics). This early “Plexi” versions (up to 1968) are really articulate and have a real nice “roar”.

With more power tubes, the amp had more headroom, a tighter bass response and more definition.

It was the first Marshall with a solid state rectifier.

This is a photo of a JTM-45/100, but it’s the same headbox used for the early Super Leads Back of a Marshall Super Lead I think you are all familiar with this amp. If you want to hear this amp, listen to any Free live performance.

Paul Kossoff was the man who really knew how to use these.

These amps had two “sections” (The most common thing to do was to set one section to Lead specs and the other one to Bass specs). SIR studios declined all the offers they received for it.